Started

Get down and dirty growing your food...
minnie
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Started

Postby minnie » Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:13 am

We got our cultivator the other day and yesterday as it hadn't rained for a day to two, I dug my first row!!

Sooo excited to start our veggies again, and at the moment veg will be more than scarce in the coming months with QLD and VIC floods.

Apparently a local McDonalds couldn't even supply burgers the other day due to shortages. Just shows instead of all those tree plantations they should have been growing food.

Will the first garden again and try for another strip (almost got bogged, it's still wet) and get some seedlings in, in the next week...
:D :D
Vicki

Hayhay
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Re: Started

Postby Hayhay » Sun Jan 23, 2011 1:28 pm

Good stuff! Enjoy your vegies~!

Heidi
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Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Sun Jan 23, 2011 2:39 pm

Good work!

Did I mention that I planted out my vegie garden the day before the flood warning was issued :lol: It looked lovely for a day or two.

Will get on to it shortly too, because its now a very clean slate! DH had borrowed a tractor with a 6ft rotary hoe on it, and had thoroughly tilled the soil, then drove down and down the local school's plot too.

Not certain if I will mulch this time, because it just seems that it makes it that much harder to get the weeds out. I don't think there's going to be an issue with keeping them moist this season!

So Vicki, what did you plant out in your row?

H

Glyn
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Re: Started

Postby Glyn » Sun Jan 23, 2011 3:23 pm

Yep also done a bit on the rotary hoe - seeds of carrots, beans, silver beet are in & transplanted out more capsicums. Sweet corn to go in next and sweet potatoes to divide. Gee what the water didn't rot the pests are now demolishing. Because of the wet the fruit fly baits -that were working so well before - suddenly lost their punch and all the apples , figs, tomatoes etc are stung to smithereens. There are green and black striped caterpillars destroying the silver beet - & normally even the snails cant over whelm that. The slugs and snails are everywhere, and the long horned grasshoppers are around in squadrons. I had transplanted some dahlias into the veggie garden as the tubers were rotting in the flower beds. These grass hoppers love their flowers heads, but at least that makes them easier to spot than on the veggies. Maybe I'll keep them there. About the only thing in bountiful amounts are the cucumbers, other cucurbits are struggling - watermelons threw in the towel, Zuccs stalled & even the pumpkins are only producing male flowers . I also don't know if I'll go with the mulch any more this season - its just protecting the slugs and snails. Mind you the birds are so well fed now they probably couldn't be bothered with them any more anyway.
While I'm on the pest and disease moan - the dogs got eczema and the calf has mange - all helped along by the wet and mud apparently.
Still it is good to be able to get back into the garden now that it is dry enough to turn over, and we can but hope that these planting come to fruition, and the vet bill is a small one!
:) Glyn

Heidi
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Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Sun Jan 23, 2011 5:45 pm

Gee Glyn, have you been smited by God? :lol: Sounds like the seven plagues have descended upon you :twisted: !

Ooooo... guess what I found to protect my figs? Huge king size mozzie nets from the op shop! $4 each, and they have worked brilliantly. Not a fruit fly got into them this year! I'm actually eating brown turkey figs from my chicken coop! Keep an eye out for them, I really recommend them. I'm going to put it on the cherry guava tree next, but I think I may have missed the boat already, they started to set fruit about four weeks ago, and it needs to be done at that time.

Glad you are keeping on keeping on Glyn,
H

Glyn
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Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:42 am

Re: Started

Postby Glyn » Mon Jan 24, 2011 6:00 am

Heidi I envy you your op shop - the ones I have access to have very little in but I keep looking hopefully anyway :) . I had heard that crazy's have mossie nets cheap at time too, but they probably won't be those nice big ones. Will definately grab them when I see them though. The whole garden seemed to be nicely in balance before the wet and now its as if its lost its mojo! Maybe the plants have become weakened or the predators have moved to drier climes. Or maybe the lergies have finally discovered this smorgasbord amongst the forest and it was only a matter of time anyway. What ever they are about to discover that the one eyed dragon lives here :twisted:
Glyn

Heidi
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Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Mon Jan 24, 2011 7:26 am

Hey Glyn,
As I look around at my yard, which was under water, I think to myself.... well at least it got rid of the bugs! Now I know everything must have moved to higher ground... ie. your place!
All jokes aside, I do think you're spot on regarding the garden balance, I think it will work itself out eventually, but its hard waiting for natural predators to knock each other out!
H

Shadowgirlau
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Re: Started

Postby Shadowgirlau » Mon Jan 24, 2011 8:52 am

Hi Ladies, sounds to me like you all have everything under control. Way to go!
While you are all busily putting your gardens in we have just pulled our out (well half of it) as what was in there was growing badly. If it wasn't the bugs then it was something else as growth was poor and as they (the plants) were not as healthy and vigorous as they were supposed to be we felt that we were wasting good resources on them for nothing. We have had to buy water in twice already this season and the water man comes for a third time today. Of course it has been raining all night and still doing so but those are the breaks. Likely wouldn't be enough water to fill the tank anyway :shock:
Gosh what we have spent on water already could buy us vegetables for the whole year then again as I tell DH they wouldn't taste the same or be as good for you :lol:

So at the moment we have half a garden, I am going to start remaking the garden beds, will pull out the bricks and shovel up the existing soil, replace the bricks and this time cement them in place because I now know for sure that I am happy with their placement. I shall also be putting in reticulation this time as well. Once all that is done I will add some new soil/compost/and goodies so that it all has time to settle before the next planting out effort.

Shall be watching for news of all your gardening efforts as you progress.

Kathleen
Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans.
- John Lennon

minnie
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Re: Started

Postby minnie » Mon Jan 24, 2011 11:34 am

Hi Heidi,

Haven't got any seed in yet, am thinking to start them in a poly box and plant out as seedlings, looks like hot weather so could be the best strategy and I can turn over the row and add some fertiliser and turn that into the soil as well before planting.

Take both your points about mulch... will save it for hot weather. ;)

Hi Glyn,

How bad is the Rain Scald on the calf? We had one got that a little a couple of years back but nothing this year... but the buffalo fly have hit with a vengence!
:D
Vicki

Glyn
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Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:42 am

Re: Started

Postby Glyn » Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:02 am

Rain Scald? Never heard of it - and all those years of dairying in soggy NZ you'd have thought we'd know it very well! Spoke to our neighbor last night and hes had it on his horses, and the web gave us pictures which look horrific. This is not on her back but down the outside of her hind legs and under her chin, no scabs, and no obvious irritation, just loss of hair. She has a hut to get into but does tend to stand with her head in and bum out, although she does sleep in there happily enough. Some of the sites suggested spraying with iodine, alum or copper sulphate , rubbing with teat salve (to keep water out) and of course antibiotics. - I'll give her a squirt with iodine, and some cydectine - that I have on hand. I'll have a word to the vet, its not that bad but if it can potentially get like those photos I'd best nip it in the bud. Thanks for the help.

Oh and Heidi, I'll post a few lergies back to you then- just to keep things in balance at your place :P
Glyn

Heidi
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Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Tue Jan 25, 2011 8:15 am

Too funny Glyn! No keep all your little critters to yourself please! How about unleashing the chooks upon them?

Regarding the "mange" is it perhaps an insect problem? My horse is allergic to sandflies, mozzies and other biting insects.... there's a product called "Switch" that evidently works (I don't use it, I just keep her in a summer rug 24/7). However, in the flood I needed to move her to a different property, and her legs are just a mass of sores, bumps and scabs that are gradually healing.
You could try bathing with a dilute solution of tea tree oil, and/or rubbing the affected spots with fresh aloe vera. Can you get close enough?
Goodluck
H

minnie
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Re: Started

Postby minnie » Tue Jan 25, 2011 9:23 am

Hi Glyn,

It's how are calf looked as well just missing fur no scabs.

The first time I saw it, we went to look at a 'jersey cow' and calf we were thinking of buying and the calf had hardly any fur and the fellow had some wash from his vet that was helping.

I know neighbours at Hogarth Range had had it from time to time, but it always cleared up, without getting like some of the pics (I've seen them too) :(

Ah just thought about that jersey now better write back on the other post about it...

Dug a couple more rows early before the heat of the day, and have changed my mind will plant seed straight to soil for some and get seedlings going at the same time.
:D
Vicki

Heidi
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Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:57 am

Oh no... we've turned this site into a Cow Board!
Sorry,
H :lol:

dggoatlover
Posts: 274
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 1:24 pm
Location: Central Queensland

Re: Started

Postby dggoatlover » Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:48 pm

My goats have had a bit of rain scald this year with the amount of humid weather we have had and our alpacas get it also. We use a sulphur based cream called Nu-stock. Works great!

minnie
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Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:23 am
Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: Started

Postby minnie » Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:07 pm

Hi Desley,

I didn't know alpacas got it too... haven't really noticed that on ours but gee whiz either buffalo fly or horse fly has got them on the nose, inside ears and eyes...

Vicki

Glyn
Posts: 199
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:42 am

Re: Started

Postby Glyn » Fri Feb 04, 2011 2:40 pm

Well we tee tree oiled the dog and cydectined the calf and they are both better - the lergies now seem to have vacated them and taken up residence on the chooks - poor itchy birds, but at last they have nice dry sand to bath in and I've given them a squirt behind the neck for good measure too.

I take back what I said about not using mulch- I had to about face as the ground is now setting like concrete . Its soo hot and dry I'm back to watering - who would have believed it?

Glyn

minnie
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Re: Started

Postby minnie » Sat Feb 05, 2011 10:11 am

Hi Glyn,

Just as I decided not to mulch the weather turned and we said the same, we need rain. :o

I'm waiting on DH sorting a little for watering, so I can water the seeds... :roll:

Anyone with a cat, NEVER put Tea Tree or other essential oil (eg. lavender) on a cat, it will cause kidney failure. Dogs are different and their kidneys can deal with it, hence all the dog shampoo with tea tree. I don't even diffuse oils these days as it doesn't take much and I've already killed my old cat as the Vet said I could put tea tree on her (about 13 years ago) and then found out and read more to discover what I'd done.

I think it's an ingredient in cattle coat as well, so I don't wipe that on the cats either, have you tried cattle coat on the dog Glyn??

Rotten flies (buffalo and horse) are in huge numbers here this year, next year we're tagging.

Vicki

Heidi
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Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: Started

Postby Heidi » Sat Feb 05, 2011 12:39 pm

Its a shocking season for all the bities isn't it! I rug my two horses in summer with light weight and light coloured horse rugs, only taking them off for the stinking hot days. My old pony got eaten alive on the legs as I had to put her on higher ground on a sandy bush block of land. Her legs were almost bare of hair and bleeding from so many horsefly bites, and she lost weight (even in a week) from having to walk around so much to keep them off her. They even bit through the horse rug.

I'm actually looking at trying to source a summer weight cow rug for my Jersey (at least) for next year. I was thinking maybe this would help control the buffalo fly a little more, without having to resort ever three weeks to Cytdectin. I've seen crude ones made up of just plain heission sacking, and was thinking I could sew one up as a prototype easily (for her to rip to shreds in about an hour more than likely)

Bye for now,
H

Glyn
Posts: 199
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:42 am

Re: Started

Postby Glyn » Sat Feb 05, 2011 1:56 pm

We learned the hard way with buffalo fly the first year we were here. We had a number of the steers go down with three day sickness which was being spread by bitey flies and then the neighbors tagged their cattle & we ended up with all their buffalo flies here too.Our poor cattle went crazy until we got them some tags. We now tag everything (except milk fed calves) every year, usually in December and that gets us through. This year we have the double tags which are supposed to last a little longer but somehow I think the singles were better - or maybe it is such a bad year that even the double tags are being challenged. Tagging every year is not as bad as it sounds- we just use the same tag holes and they're pretty relaxed about it, all except the bull we've borrowed - he was a bit of a handful and as a result his tags are comical - one on back to front and the other is still upside down and at a jaunty angle, he wasn't too keen on letting me straighten it up for him either!

minnie
Posts: 2700
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:23 am
Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: Started

Postby minnie » Sat Feb 05, 2011 3:41 pm

Hi Glyn,

Yes that's what's happened to us this year, everyone out here with hundreds of head tag, and only our poor little herd are available to the fly.

Cydectin kept them off for 3 days as did Coopers pour on, so now I'm squirting cattle coat daily and they're still getting them... not quite as bad but certainly not totally free.

And Heidi, the horse flies are shockers I'm sure they're what are giving the alpacas a terrible time... and my legs, I look like some are going to turn into ulcers... tea treeing my legs. ;)

Have you tried Pony Coat on the horses, it's the same as Cattle coat organic and if you can wipe it over them and down their legs it works (I'm doing that with Fatima and she's fine) but not as good this year with a squirt.

We're with you next year Glyn, tagging!

Vicki


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