Unexpected Calf

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tampeirce
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Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:10 am
Location: Macedon Victoria Australia
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Unexpected Calf

Postby tampeirce » Mon Aug 22, 2011 10:37 am

Dear All,
Please remind me ,it has been 28 years or so, since I have had a calf arrive. All went well 2 months before I thought she met the bull so I must have bought her just in calf . Very lucky as she , Luka is Half Dexter Jersey / Holstein cross. Costly Vet test did not pick it up as she must have been within a month of conceiving.
So what I need help with ;
I started milking her on day 3 , day 4 now , one quarter had some VERY yelllow lumps , less so today. If they go away , and are not mastites when is the milk good to drink?
If it is Mastites do I have to antibiotic her or can it go away?
The calf will stay on her . So I am worried about her injesting antibiotic , which she would if I put it in her teat.
Thanks in advance ,
Kind regards,
Tam

dggoatlover
Posts: 274
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 1:24 pm
Location: Central Queensland

Re: Unexpected Calf

Postby dggoatlover » Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:49 am

I would say your girl is still giving some colostrum? Keep milking her out and keep an eye on it. It usually settles after the first week and the milk should be fine to drink after that.

Heidi
Posts: 582
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: Unexpected Calf

Postby Heidi » Wed Aug 24, 2011 10:05 pm

Hi Tam,
I only just saw this (internet mucking up). Okay, frequent milking both by yourself and the calf will help greatly. Make up an udder rub consisting of the following..
fresh aloe vera (doesn't matter the quantity.. think a lot)
cayenne pepper or curry powder whatever is in the pantry
some olive oil, or whatever oil you have available to you
tumeric (if you have it, a natural anti-inflammatory)
now whiz it all up in the blender until its a nice sticky mess and take it out and put it into a jar with a lid. To the jar add a few good drops of Ti tree oil (do not put this in the blender or you will never ever get the smell and taste out of the plastic). Give it a really good shake.

After every milking give slather this rub over her udder (or the affected quarters). Give it a massage for as long as you have time to do it and leave it on. If your saving the milk, you'll need to wash it off before you milk, otherwise you'll get the milk tainted.

Keep doing this, and tasting the milk too. Mastic milk is salty to taste, as well as lumpy and somewhat slimy (it leaves a slimy residue on cheesecloth as it filters through).

If it doesn't resolve within a few days, or you are concerned that its getting worse, then you may have to go the antibiotic route. You can use a teat infusion on a lactating cow, and the infusion will stain the milk blue for the entire time that it should be withheld from HUMAN consumption. Obviously if you are going for pure organic meat in the calf, then the calf shouldn't have access to the milk, otherwise, it is perfectly safe for the calf to drink the blue tinged milk (check with the vet but I'm 99% certain that is the case). The good things in the milk far outweigh the antibiotics in the milk from the calf's perspective. If concerned you can slurp some natural yogurt or probiotics down the calfs throat (which is much easier if you are bottle feeding) otherwise, get your hands gooey with yogurt and get the calf to suck it off your hands!

Now if the mastitis is gone, then the milk is good to drink whenever the collostrum has gone. The bright yellow colour should give way to normal milk colour (for your breed). I had pink milk for the first ten days, so was giving that to the chooks and dogs.

Goodluck,
Heidi

tampeirce
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Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:10 am
Location: Macedon Victoria Australia
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Re: Unexpected Calf

Postby tampeirce » Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:38 pm

Thanks Heidi,
Thats brilliant,
There was a very faint showing in the in line Mastitis indicator , I then pour it through a very fine sieve , there was nothing in that. The calf is on her full time and I bring both in to milk in the morning . She produced 8lt this morning , I do not use teat dip or balm as the calf is suckling . ( Do you agree with that?)
If the signs get worse I will make your salve and use it . Hopefully we will not need it.
I will be writing about the legalising of raw milk . It would be fantastic if got through.
Cheers Tam

Heidi
Posts: 582
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: Unexpected Calf

Postby Heidi » Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:17 pm

Hi,
I know lots of people use teat dips and balms for udders. I use warm water and very mild dishwashing detergent for a wash down of the udder before I milk. I haven't used balms or the like simply because her teats are in good order. A few minor cracks, but with a calf on her throughout the day, it would get sucked straight off! If her teats get really dried out and cracked, a teat balm when you've separated for the night would be beneficial.

Sounds like you won't need the mastitis mix as its going to clear up with what you're doing. That's great, and exactly what you want!
H

minnie
Posts: 2700
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:23 am
Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: Unexpected Calf

Postby minnie » Fri Aug 26, 2011 8:21 am

Hi Guys,

I use uddersan (iodine) for cheesemaking which is used by the dairies for teats, it also contains something to hydrate the teats (I think).

:)
Vicki


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